The Best Boxing Matches In Modern History

The Best Boxing Matches In Modern History Boxing is one of the most popular and most influential sports in the world. Throughout the years, we’ve witnessed many legends step into the ring and achieve greatness which will be remembered for eternity. Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, Mike Tyson, and Sugar Ray Robinson are just a few of those legends which managed to make the impossible look easy and show the world that with the proper dedication, there is no height that cannot be reached.

This sport also managed to influence other industries. One of the most interesting and surprising was the online casino industry. Research has shown that boxing fans are also quite fond of these games, which is why game providers have supplied sites like casino777.es with various virtual boxing games, as well as with slot games that are themed on this sport. The idea is to make boxing fans feel comfortable and enjoy them to the maximum.

It goes without saying that boxing is a respected sport. The sportsmen act as role models and continue to elevate this discipline with each passing day. We, the fans, have watched many great fights over the years, and with that thought in mind, we decided to name our list of the top 3 fights in the modern era. Let’s check them out.

Floyd Mayweather – Manny Pacquiao

Dubbed as the Fight of the Century, Floyd Mayweather versus Manny Pacquiao went down as the most anticipated fight in the history of boxing. After spending several years negotiating, both of these fighters clashed on May 2, 2015. The fight was televised through a PPV and broke the record with approximately 4.6 million buys.

Although the pre-fight era was very pumped, the fight itself let many people down. Critics stated that Floyd was too defensively orientated, which made it very boring. Several post-fight controversies like the supposed shoulder injury by Manny, and the IV injections that Floyd took also came to light. It is worth mentioning that Floyd won the bout via unanimous decision.

Anthony Joshua – Wladimir Klitschko

Next up, we have a bout in which the underdog managed to shock the world as he beat one of the greatest heavyweight boxers in the history of the sport. Although Joshua has already made a name for himself at the time, no one believed that he has the skills to beat Klitschko. The fight took place on April 29, 2017, at Wembley Stadium in London and it is safe to say that it exceeded the expectations of the fans by a milestone.

It was filled with action, knockdowns, and was named Fight of the Year by The Ring and the Boxing Writers Association of America. Anthony Joshua beat Wladimir via eleventh-round TKO and won the IBF and the vacant WBA (Super) and IBO heavyweight titles.

Deontay Wilder – Tyson Fury II

Our last entry on this list is the rematch between Wilder and Fury. The first fight showed just how good both of these fighters were. Wilder managed to keep one of the most skilled boxers at bay, while Fury put on a flawless show after battling drug and alcohol abuse, as well as depression for the past few years.

Since the first fight ended in a draw, the rematch was highly anticipated and many fans around the world were keen to see these two fighters step in the ring one more time. The rematch took place on February 22, 2020, at the MGM Grand. Fury TKO’d Wilder out in the seventh round. In that round, Wilder’s corner threw the towel and the referee stopped the fight.

James ‘Buster’ Douglas Knocks Out Tyson 1990

James 'Buster' Douglas Knocks Out Tyson 1990 While many of the big fights are held within the vicinity of a Las Vegas best payout casino, on February 11, 1990, ‘Iron’ Mike Tyson, 23, stepped into the ring at the Tokyo Dome for the fight billed as ‘Tyson is Back!’ unbeaten in 37 fights, including ten world title fights, and as the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. By contrast, his opponent, James ‘Buster’ Douglas, 30, had already suffered four defeats – including a tenth round technical knockout by Tony Tucker in his only previous world title fight in 1987 – and was expected to be little more than ‘cannon fodder’ for Tyson, as he warned up for a meeting with undefeated heavyweight contender Evander Holyfied. Indeed, Tyson later recalled, ‘I didn’t consider Buster Douglas much of a challenge. I had easily beaten everybody who had knocked him out.’

However, Douglas belied odds of 42/1 offered by bookmakers and online casino sites by  proving the sharper of the pair right from the start. He kept Tyson at bay with a series of good, solid jabs, and repeatedly clinched as the largely rhythmless, ineffective champion attempted to counter attack. In the eighth round, though, Douglas succumbed to an uppercut, which knocked to the canvas. He survived until the end of the round and, in the ninth, Tyson went for a quick finish but, in so doing, exposed himself to series of hard, right-hand counter-punches. Tyson barely survived the round and, in the tenth, Douglas landed a fierce, right-hand uppercut of his own, followed by a right-left-right-left combination that left Tyson fumbling for his gumshield as the referee counted him out.

The ‘Rumble in the Jungle’

The 'Rumble in the Jungle' The ‘Rumble in the Jungle’ was a world heavyweight championship title fight between the unbeaten reigning champion, George Foreman, and challenger Muhammad Ali, who had been stripped of his world heavyweight title after refusing to be inducted into the US Army in 1967. The fight took place at what is now the Stade Tata Raphaël in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, on October 30, 1974, at 4am local time, to cater for American television audiences.

In his previous title defence, against Ken Norton in Caracas, Venzuela in March, 1974, Foreman had won inside two rounds and was expected to make equally short work of Ali. Indeed, Foreman said later that he had hit Ali ‘with the hardest shot to the body’ that he had ever delivered. Nevertheless, by adopting by what was dubbed the ‘Rope-a-Dope’ strategy, Ali leant back against the loose ring ropes and absorbed punishment with his arms and body, while constantly taunting Foreman into more and more powerful, looping punches.

As the fight wore on Foreman, who had not fought more than four rounds since winning by technical knockout in the tenth round against Gregorio Peralta in Oakland, California more than three years previously, visibly tired. As Foreman ran out of steam, Ali landed a series of increasingly potent counter punches, culminating in a right-left-right combination late in the eighth round, which knocked his opponent to the canvas. Foreman rose to his feet, but not quickly enough, and was counted out by referee Zach Clayton.

Watch the Rumble in the Jungle fight

Henry Cooper vs. Cassius Clay 1963

Henry Cooper vs. Cassius Clay 1963 The late Sir Henry Cooper, popularly known as ‘Our ‘Enry’, was one of the most celebrated and successful British boxers since World War II. Cooper turned professional, at the age of 20, in 1954 and went on to enjoy a highly successful professional career; he never won a world title, but was British and Commonwealth heavyweight champion between 1959 and 1971 and European heavyweight champion between 1968 and 1971.

However, for all his success, Cooper is probably best remembered for his narrow, and controversial, defeat by 21-year-old Cassius Clay – soon to become Muhammad Ali – in a non-title fight at Wembely Stadium, London in June, 1963, which very nearly changed the course of boxing. Before the fight, Clay had brashly predicted, ‘It ain’t no jive, Henry Cooper will go in five!’

Nevertheless, towards the end of the fourth round, Cooper, 28, unleashed a trademark left hook – dubbed ”Enry’s ‘Ammer’ – which knocked Clay to the canvas for a count of four. When the bell sounded, Clay was sitting on the seat of his pants, back against the ropes, and had to be walked back to his stool by trainer Angelo Dundee. Dundee administered smelling salts before, apparently, discovering a split in Clay’s glove, which he brought to the attention of the referee Tommy Little.

According to Cooper, Dundee subsequently freely admitted, more than once, that he had deliberately slashed the glove to give Clay more time to recover between rounds. A replacement pair of gloves were fetched from the dressing room and, in the fifth round, a rejuvenated Clay set to work on slicing up Cooper’s already bloodied face; a heavily bleeding cut over his left eye left Cooper unable to see properly and the contest was stopped, with Clay winning by technical knockout.

Watch the Henry Cooper vs. Cassius Clay fight