Derby County Football Club 2007/08

Derby County Football Club 2007/08 In 2006/2007, Derby County finished third in the English Football League Championship and were promoted to the Premier League after beating West Bromwich Albion in the play-off final at Wembley Stadium. However, in 2007/08, Derby County became, without question, the worst team in the history of the Premier League, repeatedly hitting the headlines for all the wrong reasons and breaking several unenviable records. Not exactly an ‘accomplishment’ you’d want as a club sponsor. Instead of drawing in online casinos uk as advertisers, local plumbers would surely soon become more likely!

The 2007/08 Premier League season started brightly enough, with a 2-2 draw against Portsmouth at Pride Park but, in the next four matches, the Rams conceded 22 goals and scored just one; after the fifth match of the season, a 6-0 defeat away to Liverpool, bookmaker Paddy Power began paying out on relegation bets. Ironically, in the sixth match, Derby County won their only match of the season, against Newcastle at Pride Park, leading manager Billy Davies to declare, ‘We’re up and running’.

Five days later, Derby County were beaten 5-0 away at Arsenal and, in November, with the Rams rooted firmly at the bottom of the Premier League table, Davies left the club ‘by mutual consent’ after eighteen months in charge. His replacement, former Wigan Athletic manager Paul Jewell, later described his decision to take over as ‘the worst move I’ve ever made’.

Jewell failed to improve results and, in late March, 2008, Derby County suffered the ignominy of becoming the first team to be relegated from the Premier League in March, with six games remaining. I’m pretty sure by this stage the players would’ve rather stayed home and played high roller online casinos . By the end of a wretched campaign, the Rams had still only won a single match, but lost 29 and, between September, 2007 and May, 2008, gone 32 consecutive league matches without winning. Derby County scored just 20 goals, but conceded 89, giving them a goal difference of -69 or, in other words, 44 goals worse than any other team in the Premier League, and amassed a paltry 11 points.

Fred Perry Wins Wimbledon Highlights (VIDEO)


Click through to read about Fred Perry’s accomplishments 

Fred Perry Wins French Open 1935

Fred Perry Wins French Open 1935 Born in Stockport, England in 1909, Frederick John ‘Fred’ Perry was the most successful British tennis player ever. Long before a modern world of best mobile casinos and indeed before turning professional in late 1936 – a decision for which he was widely criticised – Perry spent three years as the number one ranked amateur tennis player in the world. In 1934, 1935 and 1936, Perry won eight Grand Slam singles, including three consecutive victories in the Wimbledon Gentlemen’s Singles without losing a set.

His most notable victory came in the French Championships, commonly known as the French Open, in 1935. The tournament was staged, as it is today, on outdoor red clay courts at Stade Roland-Garros in Paris. Perry dropped the first set of his second-round match against the unseeded Vladimir Landau but, thereafter, beat Enrique ‘Bubi’ Maier, fifteenth seed Don Turnbull, seventh seed Christian Boussus and third seed Jack Crawford in straight sets en route to the final.

In that final, second-seeded Perry faced reigning champion, and number one seed, Gottfried von Cramm, a tall, blonde Saxon aristocrat and one of the greatest tennis players Germany has ever produced. In any event, Perry defeated his illustrious opponent 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, 6-3 and, in so doing, became the first player ever to win all four Grand Slam singles titles – completing what is known, nowadays, as a ‘Career Grand Slam’. Perry accomplished the feat at the age of 26 and, decades later, remains the only British tennis player ever to have done so. Perhaps it’s a sign. I have take a moment away from www.cinemacasino.com and pick up a tennis racket!

To watch Fred Perry’s Wimbledon highlights click through

Chris Hoy Beijing 2008 (VIDEO)

Read about Chris Hoy’s Beijing Olympics