Red Rum Wins Third Grand National 1977

Red Rum Wins Third Grand National 1977  Famously trained by the late Donald ‘Ginger’ McCain on the sands of Southport Beach on Merseyside, northwest England, Red Rum won the Grand National for the first time in 1973. On that occasion, ridden by Brian Fletcher, Red Rum overhauled long-time leader, Crisp, who had been thirty lengths clear at one stage, in the dying strides to win by three-quarters of a length in a course record time of 9 minutes and 1.9 seconds.

Red Rum and Fletcher returned to Aintree for another crack at the celebrated steeplechase in 1974 and duly won again. Despite the welter burden of twelve stone, Red Rum came home seven lengths ahead of his nearest rival, L’Escargot. In so doing, he became the first horse since Reynoldstown, in 1936, to record back-to-back wins in the Grand National and – notwithstanding subsequent reductions in the maximum weight carried – remains the only horse since World War II to carry such a weight to victory. Red Rum finished second in the 1975 and 1976 renewals of the Grand National, in 1975 under Brian Fletcher and in 1976 under Tommy Stack, who replaced Fletcher after the latter made disparaging comments to the press about Red Rum and was informed by McCain that he would not be riding the horse again.

Stack was once again aboard Red Rum when he lined up, as a twelve-year-old, for the 1977 Grand National. Generally regarded as past his prime, Red Rum was, nonetheless, saddled with top-weight once again, albeit just eleven stone and eight pounds, and was sent off joint-second favourite at 9/1. He took the lead at the twenty-second fence, Becher’s Brook on the second circuit, following the departure of favourite Andy Pandy, and stormed home to his unprecedented third win in the race, twenty-five lengths clear of his nearest rival.

Watch Red Rum win the 1977 Grand National

Red Rum Wins 1977 Grand National (VIDEO)

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The World Cup’s Great Underdog Tales

The saying goes that “the world only remembers the winners”… but that’s not always true.

Here we look back at World Cup history and pick out two of the great underdog stories, of sides that didn’t win the tournament, but left it with their heads held high.

A Rugby Nation Celebrates its Soccer Stars

Look back to the 2010 World Cup and New Zealand were making only their second appearance in the major tournament after beating Bahrain to reach the competition. An island nation that takes great pride in its All Blacks rugby union side, it was the All Whites who took centre stage for the competition in South Africa. In a group that included Italy, Paraguay and Slovakia, the Kiwis were not given much of a chance of picking up any points in the pool. While New Zealand failed to reach the knockout stages, they did manage to go through their group without losing a match and were the only team to be undefeated at the tournament. Even the eventual winners Spain suffered a 1-0 loss to Switzerland on their way to World Cup glory.

New Zealand started with a 1-1 draw against Slovakia thanks to an injury-time goal from Winston Reid, before a remarkable stalemate against Worlds Cup holders Italy. Scoring early can give an underdog a real confidence boost and Shane Smeltz’s opener after seven minutes certainly did that. However, it was by no means the quickest goal in the tournament’s history as there have been numerous goals within the first minute including Hakan Sukur’s strike within 11 seconds in 2002 for Turkey against South Korea.

Vincenzo Iaquinta went on to equalise for the Azzurri in the 29th minute from the penalty spot, before New Zealand held on for a famous draw at Mbombela Stadium. A goalless draw with Paraguay meant the Kiwis missed out on reaching the knockouts by a point, but they did finish above the Italians and headed back to New Zealand with plenty of plaudits for their efforts.

Cameroon Take African Football Forward

There have been some great runs from African nations at World Cups, with the likes of Senegal (2002) and Ghana (2010) being two prime examples. But Cameroon back in 1990 were the first African country to really make a statement on the world stage. The Indomitable Lions managed to secure a 1-0 win over eventual finalists Argentina in their opening game of Italia 90, with François Omam-Biyik scoring the all-important goal. The result was even more remarkable considering Cameroon had two players sent off in the match against an Argentina side captained by the great Diego Maradona.

Cameroon then went on to beat Romania 2-1, before a heavy 4-0 defeat at the hands of the Soviet Union. Still, Cameroon managed to finish top of Group B before their 38-year-old forward Roger Milla became a world sensation with his goals and eye-catching celebrations. Milla bagged a brace as Cameroon beat Colombia 2-1 in extra-time in the last-16, before a heartbreaking 3-2 defeat to England in the quarter-finals. It took extra time to separate the two sides, and Cameroon left the tournament having put African football firmly on the map.

World Cups are more than just about the winners, and Qatar 2022 is likely to produce its own stories of underdogs who will grab the headlines.

 

Which horse holds the record for the fastest time in the Kentucky Derby?

Which horse holds the record for the fastest time in the Kentucky Derby?  Secretariat, the legendary chestnut racehorse, holds the record for the fastest time ever recorded in the Kentucky Derby. This historic moment occurred in 1973 at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky, and left an unforgettable mark on the world of horse racing.

Under the guidance of jockey Ron Turcotte, Secretariat showcased a remarkable blend of power, speed, and elegance as he thundered down the track. The crowd was awestruck as he effortlessly left his competitors behind, displaying an unparalleled level of dominance.

Crossing the finish line in an astonishing time of 1 minute 59.40 seconds, Secretariat shattered the previous record, etching his name into horse racing history. This extraordinary achievement reflected his exceptional abilities and the meticulous training that had prepared him for this defining race.

Secretariat’s victory went beyond the realm of horse racing, captivating the nation and earning him a special place in the hearts of millions. He became a symbol of determination, grace, and the pursuit of greatness.

Even today, Secretariat’s legacy remains strong. His name is synonymous with the Kentucky Derby, serving as a reminder of the extraordinary athletes and moments that define the sport. His record-breaking time continues to inspire future generations, igniting a passion for horse racing and showcasing the limitless possibilities of equine athleticism.

Secretariat’s remarkable feat as the fastest horse in the history of the Kentucky Derby stands as a testament to his unparalleled talent and the enduring allure of this prestigious race. His legacy lives on as an emblem of greatness and serves as a constant source of inspiration for those who strive to push the boundaries of horse racing excellence.